Marie Claire Millionaire“I’m so far from where I started that I feel like I’ve already made it.” -Jean Brownhill Lauer, founder of Sweeten

For a little Monday motivation, read about three women who struggled to pay the bills before working their way into hugely successful careers. Jean Brownhill Lauer grew up poor, down the street from crack houses. Elle Kaplan came to New York City with $200 and a simple goal: to help women take charge of their own money management. Kat Cole started out as a Hooters hostess…while working two other jobs. Learn where these trailblazers are today—and how they did it—in Marie Claire‘s “I went from flat broke to millionaire.

Cosmo Demi Lovato

What’s that screeching sound? (Covers ears.) Oh that? That’s just the sound of a million young girls reacting to this morning’s announcement that Demi Lovato and Nick Jonas are going on tour together! Tickets to the Forever Now tour go on sale November 7. Until then, content yourself with reading about the unstoppable, unfathomably awesome Demi in the September issue of Cosmopolitan.


Bloomberg Businessweek 2015-10-26 00:00:00 CoverBonnie Ross is the executive behind the guns-a-blazin’ action and elaborate world-building of video game Halo 5: Guardians, which comes out tomorrow. Most of us don’t think of the words “women” and “gaming” in the same sentence, but Ross has been running the Halo show since 2007. Read more about her path to the top job—and the pressure on Halo 5 to save the Xbox—in Bloomberg Businessweek.

Health UnBoob Job

October is Breast Cancer Awareness month, and it’s important to remember that breast health means many things. Health magazine explores the trend of women getting an “(un)boob job”—having their breast implants removed. Some women have an “explant” because their feelings about their appearance have changed; others do it to avoid costly surgeries down the line. Many choose to undergo the procedure because, as they age, they become concerned that their implants will prevent a mammogram from spotting trouble. Find their stories in the November issue.


Smithsonian Tituba

The Salem witch trials have been investigated, reported on and fictionalized in every possible medium, but not much is known about how the whole mess started. Renowned author Stacy Schiff explores the Satanic tipping point—and the little-discussed but crucial role of an Indian slave named Tituba—in the November issue of Smithsonian. How did Tituba come to play such a major part in the crisis? And why, over the years, has her identity shifted “from Indian to half-Indian to half-black to black” to, finally, a “Negro slave”?

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