“I said, ‘I want to do what Jim Carrey’s doing.’ I was looking for something he didn’t want.” -Sandra Bullock, on finding the best roles

Time Sandra BullockSome of today’s biggest, most bankable female actors are still faced with a simple fact: The most substantive leading roles are written for men. Their solution? Rewrite male characters as female characters, then play the heck out of them, bring in serious box office, and win lots of awards. Sandra Bullock talks to TIME about the ongoing fight for gender equality in Hollywood, and how the efforts of stars like Jennifer Lawrence, Geena Davis, Emily Blunt, Angelina Jolie and Charlize Theron will have a trickle-down effect for girls and women everywhere.


 

GQ GroomzillaSpeaking of flipping the script, GQ writer Zach Baron ‘fesses up to being the ultimate Groomzilla—and liking it. Baron’s fiancée couldn’t care less about flower arrangements and seating charts, but he cares…oh, how he cares. Read his hilarious, honest and long overdue admission, just one step in a long march toward a recalibration of gender roles in America…and also, finally, validation for women everywhere who have been forced to care about tablecloth colors.


 

Marie Claire Ruby RoseActress and DJ Ruby Rose made a splash on season three of Orange Is the New Black, but she had a real impact when she cohosted the MTV Europe Music Awards with Ed Sheeran this past weekend. As she took the stage to introduce Duran Duran, Rose—who has long identified as gender fluid—said, “Ladies and gentlemen and everyone in between…” This short, sweet and inclusive turn of phrase lit up the Twitterverse with praise. Unfortunately, when the show aired in the U.S. a few hours later, the moment had been edited out. MTV defended the decision, saying the show was simply “cut down for air in the U.S.” and the full version is available online. Read more about Rose—whose gender-morphing video, Break Free, has been viewed more than 13.5 million times—in Marie Claire.


 

New Yorker 50 Best RestaurantsGroucho Marx famously said he wouldn’t want to belong to any club that would accept him as a member. What would he have to say about the “exclusive” list of the World’s 50 Best Restaurants? The New Yorker‘s Lauren Collins explores the history, influence, reputation and methods of the powerful list—which is partly sponsored by San Pellegrino—and its effect on chefs and venues across the globe. “If the wine industry has become Parkerized,” Collins writes, “then the restaurant world might be said to have been Pellegrinoed.”

Read these stories and more in New & Noteworthy on your Highlights screen. Not a subscriber yet? Click here for a free trial.