What to Drink

The bigger the Thanksgiving table, the more options you can have. These six pairings are incredible values for the money (and most will cost less at the store than the market price listed here).


By SCOTT ATKINSON
Photos by DANIEL AGEE

SPARKLING WINE

Gruet Brut, $20, New Mexico

Sparkling wine isn't just celebratory; it's actually one of the most diverse and food-friendly wines to be had. Laurent Gruet hails from Champagne, France, and uses the region's wine-making methods with grapes grown in the United States.

PINOT GRIS

Eyrie Pinot Gris, $24, Oregon

This richer white complements the myriad herbs, spices, and fruits on the table. Eyrie was the first winery outside Europe to make Pinot Gris commercially, and they've done so successfully since 1970.

CHARDONNAY

Steele Cuvée Chardonnay, $22, California

This stalwart holiday white is a guaranteed crowd-pleaser. Steele is a classic, balanced Chardonnay both for those who love the varietal and for everyone else.

PINOT NOIR

Schug Pinot Noir, $30, California

Look for reds that are lower in alcohol and tannins—the softer, juicier wines. Schug is soft enough to sip before the meal and can stand up to all the flavors of a Thanksgiving feast.

ZINFANDEL

Cline Ancient Vines Zinfandel, $18, California

A good body with a bit of spice and fruit, it plays well with all the other dishes on the table. Most zins are blended, but Cline keeps theirs as is.

BONUS PAIRING

GEWÜRZTRAMINER

Brooks Gewürztraminer, $17, Oregon

Don't discount this and other Alsatian-style wines, like Riesling, as after-dinner bottles only. Brooks amplifies fruit in cranberry sauce and stuffing and cuts through creamy or starchy sides. If it isn't available, ask your wine seller for a comparable sub.