Texture® In The Know Giveaway: Prizes & Official Rules

In The Know Giveaway - Prizes and Rules

Official Giveaway Rules

NO PURCHASE OR PAYMENT OF ANY KIND IS NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN THIS SWEEPSTAKES. A PURCHASE WILL NOT INCREASE YOUR CHANCES OF WINNING. VOID WHERE PROHIBITED.

Please read these rules before entering the Texture® In The Know Giveaway (the “Giveaway”). You agree that, by submitting an entry, you will be bound by these Official Rules and you acknowledge that you satisfy all giveaway eligibility requirements.

Eligibility. If you are an individual legal resident of the 50 United States or the District of Columbia currently residing in the United States and are older than 18 years of age, you are eligible to enter the Giveaway. Our employees and our employees’ immediate family members (spouses, domestic partners, parents, grandparents, siblings, children and grandchildren), and our affiliates, advisors or advertising/promotion agencies (and their immediate family members) are not eligible to enter the Giveaway.

Giveaway Period. The Giveaway begins at 9:00:00 a.m. (PT) on September 14, 2016 and ends at 12:00:00 p.m. (PT) on October 14, 2016 (the “Giveaway Period”). Drawings for prizes will take place at the following times, and prize winners will be contacted by email within 2 business days of each drawing:

9:00:00 a.m. PT on Wednesday, September 21

9:00:00 a.m. PT on Wednesday, September 28

9:00:00 a.m. PT on Wednesday, October 5

9:00:00 a.m. PT on Wednesday, October 12

9:00:00 a.m. PT on Friday, October 14

To be eligible for each prize drawing during the Giveaway Period, you must enter via either Entry Method #1 or Entry Method #2 below:

Entry Method #1 Texture subscribers will receive one (1) entry per day throughout the Giveaway Period for signing in to the Texture app for any length of time during that day using any app-compatible device. Non-existing Texture subscribers can start a free trial on texture.com in order to sign in to the app and earn entries via Method #1.

Entry Method #2 To receive one (1) entry per day throughout the Giveaway Period without having a Texture account and signing in to the Texture app, send a 3×5 card with your name, address, e-mail address, and phone number to: Texture March Mag-ness Giveaway, 4600 Bohannon Drive, Suite 100, Menlo Park, CA 94025.

5 Sweepstakes drawings will occur throughout the Giveaway Period. To be eligible for each Sweepstakes drawing, you must have signed in to the Texture app at least once during the Giveaway Period prior to the drawing, or you must have sent a mail-in entry received by the deadline for each Entry Period. Limit of one (1) entry per person using only one (1) Texture account or email address per day during the Giveaway Period, regardless of entry method. You may not use multiple customer accounts or email addresses to enter the Giveaway, and entries submitted from the same person through multiple accounts will be disqualified.

Mailing List. By entering the Giveaway, you consent to being placed on a mailing list for promotional and other materials from Texture. You may update or change your e-mail preferences by selecting “unsubscribe” at the bottom of any Texture email.

Other Promotions. Please note that we may be running similar giveaways at the same time as this Giveaway. By entering this Giveaway, you will not be eligible to receive any prize awarded in any other giveaway unless you enter each sweepstakes separately.

Prize. Four (4) winners will win their choice from among five (5) prizes valued at $100 each:

  • $100 Ticketmaster Gift Card
  • $100 Amazon.com Gift Card
  • $100 Williams Sonoma Gift Card
  • $100 Nordstrom Gift Card
  • $100 Nike Gift Card

One winner will win a grand prize VISA Gift Card valued at $1,000.

Total value of all rewarded prizes will be $1,400.

Each winner will be responsible for paying all costs and expenses related to the prize that are not specifically mentioned, including, but not limited to taxes and any other expenses that might reasonably be incurred by a winner in receiving or using the prize.

Prize Drawing. Five (5) random drawings will be held throughout the Giveaway Period from among all eligible entries received at the time of each drawing. We will notify each potential winner by e-mail provided within two (2) business days following the drawing, and each potential winner will be required to sign an affidavit of eligibility and liability/publicity release. We will select an alternative winner if any potential winner does not claim the prize within 72 hours of notification, or meet the eligibility criteria. The prizes will be awarded “AS IS” and WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, express or implied (including, without limitation, any implied warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose). Limit 1 prize per person for a total of 5 Sweepstakes winners.

Odds of Winning. Odds of winning depend on the number of eligible entries received throughout the Giveaway Period.

Additional Terms. We may, to the maximum extent permitted by applicable law and in our sole discretion, change these rules or cancel the Giveaway at any time; or modify, terminate, or suspend the Giveaway should viruses, worms, bugs, unauthorized human intervention or other causes beyond our control corrupt or impair the administration, security, fairness or proper play of the Giveaway or submission of entries. We are not responsible for: (a) lost, misdirected, late, postage due, incomplete, or unintelligible entries or for inaccurate entry information, whether caused by you or by any of the equipment or programming associated with or utilized in the Giveaway, or by any technical or human error that may occur in the processing of entries; (b) any printing or typographical errors in any materials associated with the Giveaway; (c) any error in the operation or transmission, theft, destruction, unauthorized access to, or alteration of, entries, or for technical, network, telephone, computer, hardware or software, malfunctions of any kind, or inaccurate transmission of, or failure to receive any entry information on account of technical problems; or (d) injury or damage to your or any other computer resulting from downloading any materials in connection with the Giveaway. We may, in our sole discretion, disqualify any individual found to be: (x) tampering with the entry process or the operation of the Giveaway; (y) acting in violation of these rules; or (z) acting in an unsportsmanlike or disruptive manner or with intent to annoy, abuse, threaten or harass any other person. If your entry is incomplete or if you use robotic, automatic, programmed or similar entry methods, your entry will be void. The authorized subscriber of the e-mail account used to enter the Giveaway at the actual time of entry will be deemed to be the participant and must comply with these rules in the event of a dispute as to entries submitted by multiple users having the same e-mail account. The authorized account subscriber is the natural person who is assigned an e-mail address by an Internet access provider, on-line service provider, or other organization responsible for assigning e-mail addresses for the domains associated with the submitted e-mail addresses. No greater than the number of prizes stated in these Official Rules will be awarded. If any technical errors occur in the selection of any potential prize winner or if more prizes are claimed than the number of prizes being awarded as provided in these Official Rules, we may award the prizes by random drawing from among all eligible claimants.

Miscellaneous. The Giveaway is governed by the laws of the United States. The Giveaway and all accompanying materials are © 2015 by Next Issue Media LLC and its affiliates. All rights reserved. If you win a prize, you may not transfer, assign, or redeem the prize for cash. We may substitute a prize with a prize of equal or greater value. Each winner agrees (for himself or herself and his or her heirs) that, by accepting the prize, we, along with each of our respective affiliates and agents (collectively, the “Released Parties”), will have no liability, and will be held harmless by the winner for any liability, loss, injury or damage to property or person, including death, and reasonable attorney’s fees and court costs, due in whole or in part, directly or indirectly, by reason of the acceptance, possession, use or misuse of the prize or participation in the Giveaway, even if caused or contributed to by the negligence of any of the Released Parties. You agree that our decisions related to the Giveaway and the random drawings are final. Each winner agrees that, by participating in the Giveaway, we may use the winner’s name, image or likeness in any manner and in any medium for our promotional purposes without additional compensation, except where prohibited by law, and we may be required to disclose the winner’s address to state regulatory authorities.

Winners’ List

After we confirm the Winners, we will post the Winners names, with first name and last initial, at https://www.texture.com/2016/09/12/in-the-know-giveaway  until December 31, 2016.

Sponsor. Next Issue Media LLC (“we” or “us”), 4600 Bohannon Drive, Suite 100, Menlo Park, CA 94025

Privacy Notice: All information submitted in connection with this Giveaway will be treated in accordance with these Official Rules and Next Issue Media’s Privacy Notice https://www.nextissue.com/legal/privacy-policy/.

Introducing Our Latest Titles

TheAtlantic

Texture adds more magazine titles to service including The Atlantic, Texas Monthly, AARP The Magazine, Variety, WWD, Reader’s Digest, Garden & Gun, and Ebony, bringing the total number of titles to more than 200. 

 

Texture, the premier app for the very best magazine content, recently added many new top titles including The Atlantic, Reader’s Digest, Garden & Gun, AARP, Variety, WWD, and Ebony.

Texture members now have access to over 200 of the most popular U.S. and Canadian magazine brands on tablets and mobile devices, with archives that are searchable for the last 5 years. The low monthly rate of $9.99, or $14.99 for the premium service remains the same even with the growing selection of magazine titles.
WWD and Variety join other trade titles that are already part of the Texture app, including Billboard, The Hollywood Reporter, and Adweek.
John Kerner, VP of Content Strategy said, “We’re excited to bring these great titles to Texture. Our goal is to bring our readers the very best content in an incredible reading experience, and all of these new additions further deliver on that promise.”
In addition to the leading magazines, Texture looks for opportunities to surprise and delight readers by delivering other top quality content. Recent examples include advance excerpts from books including The Bridge Ladies and Good as Gone, as well as a special report from Reuters; “The American Voter.”

Summer Thriller ‘Good as Gone’ Debuts in Texture

good-as-gone

In partnership with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, Texture Offers Subscribers Early Access to Highly Anticipated Suspense Novel

Texture, the premier app for the very best magazine content, and the Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Trade Publishing Group are partnering to give Texture members a special, advanced copy of the hotly anticipated summer thriller Good as Gone before its national release on July 26.

Texture members will be among the very first to read this page-turning summer mystery,” says Maggie Murphy, Editorial Director, Texture. “That’s along with the latest issues of People, Vogue, Rolling Stone, The New Yorker and 150 other great magazines. It just proves you really can’t leave home—or go on vacation—without the Texture app.”

“As both an avid book and magazine reader, I can think of no better partner than Texture to reach a curious, educated, and engaged audience looking to discover great stories on demand,” says Ellen Archer, President, HMH Trade Publishing.

In Good as Gone, debut novelist Amy Gentry weaves a propulsive mother-daughter story about a kidnapped young woman who suddenly reappears at her family’s doorstep eight years after her late night abduction. “Fans of Paula Hawkins’ The Girl on the Train will enjoy the shifting points of view and the complex female characters, and those who liked Samantha Hunt’s Mr. Splitfoot will appreciate the seedy characters and haunting theme of childhood vulnerability,” says Booklist. “Gentry’s depiction of a family working through immense suffering will connect with many readers.”

This unique partnership around Good as Gone is the latest content innovation from Texture. In March 2016, the app teamed with the long-form magazine The Atavist to publish the seven-part series “The Mastermind.” Ahead of Mother’s Day, Texture showcased an excerpt from Betsy Lerner’s New York Times best-seller The Bridge Ladies. “Thanks to HMH, for a limited time, we’re giving Texture members a preview of an entire novel. What a great way to kick off the summer reading season,” adds Murphy.

“I am confident that the Texture community will help us spread the word about Good as Gone,” says Archer. “This must-read debut is the perfect addition to beach bags.”

The Atavist Magazine’s Exclusive Series Debuts on Texture

atavist

 

When digital magazine app Texture first launched, it drew widespread comparisons to Netflix and Hulu—a joint venture by five of the largest North American publishers to provide subscribers digital access to their aggregated content in exchange for a monthly fee.

That was in 2012.

Now, fresh off of a rebranding—the service was originally known as Next Issue Media—armed with a $50 million investment and led by a new CEO, Texture is following the precedent of its cross-medium counterparts by diving into a mostly unexplored realm: original content.

Last week, Texture published the first chapter of “The Mastermind,” a new, seven-part serial produced by digital-only publication The Atavist Magazine that follows Paul Calder Le Roux’s journey from computer programmer to international drug kingpin to D.E.A. informant. For seven consecutive weeks, each Monday, a new chapter will debut exclusively on Texture—three days before appearing anywhere else.

It’s the most comprehensive exclusive-content initiative by Texture to date. With about 180 of the largest-circulation titles in the U.S. in its catalogue, the service has experimented with giving subscribers early access to individual articles in the past—Texture and Entertainment Weekly partnered to provide the former’s subscribers with the first look at a David Bowie retrospective earlier this year—but never to this extent or depth.

JohnPLoughlin

“It’s gotten a lot of traction with our subscribers. They see it as a real positive,” John Loughlin, Texture’s CEO, tells Folio:. “We thought that this was a logical extension to push this notion of very high-quality journalism that generally is not widely available and to really promote it.”

Episode One premiered on March 7 and quickly became Texture’s most-read item of the week, proof of the in-depth, long form article’s ability to capture and engage a fully digital, largely mobile audience.

“I think that, for us, it’s clearly a value add in a major way for our subscribers and it shows that exceptionally well-written, well-researched pieces can get a lot of airplay,” adds Loughlin. “It’s a fairly lengthy story, even in the individual segments.”

Originally striving to bring the holistic magazine experience to an e-reading platform, Texture has shifted its focus under Loughlin’s leadership to emphasize the best individual articles its partners have to offer. An important distinction, Loughlin says, because it allows for greater exposure and discovery among readers who may not be part of a particular brand’s core audience.

Starting in October, around the time the service was rebranded as Texture, publishers began allowing it to lift individual stories out of a particular issue, which were then curated and gathered in a section of the app titled “New and Noteworthy,” a selection of not only the most popular or trending stories, but also staff picks from Texture’s editorial team—Maggie Murphy, former editor of Parade, People, and Life, was named Texture’s editorial director last summer.

“I think what we’re seeing is this opportunity to expose content in a unique way, and in a way that generates a lot of interest from people that ordinarily wouldn’t be in the slip stream of one brand or another,” Loughlin tells Folio:. “We hear that over and over. People love the magazines that they love; they’re dedicated readers. But there’s a surprise and delight in coming across stories that they would ordinarily never see.”

And that opportunity certainly extends to the Atavist partnership. A multimedia publishing platform in its own right, Atavist launched its own branded digital publication five years ago. While it’s racked up accolades—including several National Magazine Award nominations—The Atavist Magazine still has a relatively narrow audience, according to Loughlin.

“[The magazine] is gaining more and more followers and notoriety, but like many emerging brands, in the absence of huge marketing budgets, you struggle for exposure,” Loughlin continues. “The beauty here is that we’ve got enormously avid readers of premium content, and they’ve got terrific editors and a very compelling story.”

Texture LogoWhile The Atavist is admittedly a non-traditional partner for a platform that was born out of the desire to bring print magazines to life on iPhones and tablets, Loughlin says the series’ early success—Episode Two hit the app on Monday—has already generated a fair amount of conversation with current partners about undertaking a similar initiative, and that it’s only the first step in Texture’s evolution.

“I think we’ll be doing more and more of this. Part of it is this notion of finding existing partners like The Atavist, but also I would not be surprsied if in the next several months we are creating original content, as well, with contributing editors and writers. I think it’s sort of a natural progression from where we are as a service.”

Of course, Texture is not alone in the digital magazine reader market. Competitors like Zinio and Issuu have existed for several years now, joined by relative newcomers like Flipboard and newsstand platforms provided by Google and Amazon. Just yesterday, The Magazine Channel launched its own reading app.

Suffice it to say that Texture is aware of the need to distinguish itself and its services in order to survive.

“Our subscribers are paying $15 a month,” concludes Loughlin. “Part of our obligation is to create an experience that’s better than free. One of the ways you do that is by creating and presenting content that is original, isn’t readily accessible, but is of high quality.”

Maggie Murphy Chats with Mr. Magazine

Screen Shot 2016-08-22 at 1.03.11 PM

What Spotify is to music, Texture is to magazines, or so the powers-that-be at Texture by Next Issue say, especially the App’s editorial content director, Maggie Murphy. Maggie comes from a long background in print, having been editorial director and content strategist at Parade and content consultant at Time Inc. Her love for magazines knows no boundaries. And with the Texture App, which is a joint venture formed by six leading publishers – Condé Nast, Hearst, Meredith, News Corp., Rogers Communications and Time Inc., she gets to show her love and adoration to 200 different magazines at a time rather than just one.

Next Issue Media is the start-up company behind the Texture App. At the core of Next Issue’s offerings are the Texture Apps for iPad® and iPhone®, Android™ and Windows® 8 PCs and tablets, and offers a digital reading experience that gives the reader an all-access pass to the world’s best magazines.

Maggie is a strong believer in the app and believes that this is an alternative that can work in conjunction with other digital media and with print as well, to give the reader a better and more diverse experience.

I spoke with Maggie recently and we talked about Texture and the ability the app gives its readers to buy single-copy stories or immerse themselves fully into their favorite magazines; it’s all about giving them choice. Through the sampling, Maggie believes that many titles that consumers wouldn’t normally buy, they might on the other hand purchase one article or story that catches their eye and a new customer is born. It is a very interesting concept that may be the answer to developing a new digital revenue stream that actually works. It certainly shows promise and hope.

So, I hope you enjoy the Mr. Magazine™ interview with Maggie Murphy, Editorial Content Director, Texture, as she shares her hopes and dreams for the app that presents the magazines she loves in a most interesting and diverse way.

But first, the sound-bites:

unnamed-1On the differences in experience between accessing something on an article by article basis versus having an actual magazine in hand: It was getting harder and harder to find magazines, especially in New York, and I never seemed to have one in my hand when I wanted to read one. And carrying around my device and just loading the app, I was suddenly able to read things that I hadn’t in months. There was everything I loved about Real Simple at my fingertips; there was The New Yorker; Vogue; just everything. And I think it made me actually an even more diverse reader, for instance, the app’s connection and our relationship with Rogers Communications, which is one of our owners; I was going to read Maclean’s and Maclean’s take on the U.S. election is fascinating.

On whether she feels there’s a difference in experiences when it comes to actually holding a magazine to read, versus not having that weight in your hand: I feel a digital experience delivers to me quality content, and the second thing about it is that I can share that content. I’m running around over time; I’m trying to simplify my life, and I come across a story in Marie Claire that I really think my niece would love, I can send that to her in one step. I think you’re going to have people who will always love the feel of paper; they appreciate it, but the reality is that when it comes to the visual experience, the iPad does a wonderful job of giving me a beautiful image of National Geographic. It looks as vibrant on the screen as when I would produce a magazine.

On whether she agrees with the statement some publishers have made that the tablet and the homepage are dead: (Laughs) No, I don’t. I think just like the lyrics in one Bruce Springsteen song says: everything that dies one day grows back. I believe there was incredible bitterness and disappointment in the arrival of the tablet and how it was supposed to save magazines, and unfortunately that wasn’t the case. But I think there was too much too soon, before the reader was ready. And I don’t believe the technology was as nimble as our ambitions.

IMG_2143 (1)On the total number of magazines available on the app: We’re closing in on 200 magazines and recently we added the Reader’s Digest team, along with The Atavist, so we’re covering from every spectrum. And we have all of the partners’ brands, so that’s all of the magazines from Time Inc., from Sports Illustrated to People to EW and of course Time magazine. We have Condé Nast and all of their brands, such as Bon Appétit, Vogue and The New Yorker. We have all of Hearst’s wonderful titles, like Marie Claire, Esquire, Town & Country and we have titles outside our partners.

On how she feels her job has changed since her days as editor of Parade, where she created content, to her role today as a curator of content: Today Texture isn’t creating content, but I don’t think that’s off the table. I believe that could be a long-term goal and I especially think as we look at how wonderful things like The Atavist’s Mastermind is doing, that’s a model that we’re intrigued by. Fundamentally, when I said that I wanted to be a journalist, to me, that meant that I wanted to work in magazines and I am working in magazines. And I think I’m working in magazines at a time and with a platform that shows a different way to go forward.

On why someone would pay money to access content through Texture when they can get it for free on most magazine websites: What we believe is for someone who is looking for that magazine experience, and people love magazines; what we’re saying is this is a way to get all of them at your fingertips, just like there is in a Netflix model or a satellite radio model and there’s a fee for that so that we can make sure that we can continue to pay for it and continue a revenue model.

On what she’d like to say she had accomplished a year from now with Texture: The biggest problem we face right now is just that people don’t know that we exist. We’re doing our very best to get the message out there. We’re working with our owners, who have been incredibly supportive by really investing in the brand, and really updating it. We’re working on a mobile adaptive so that we’re really able to deliver magazine content in a mobile-friendly manner for the phablet that is to come. And I think it’s just really giving magazine lovers choice, of saying here’s another way.

On what motivates her to get out of bed in the morning: I still get to discover great stories; that’s what I like about it. I was talking to friends one day and they asked me why I got into this business. I simply told them: I love magazines. I thought it would be cool to work on magazines. And today I’m not working on simply one; I’m working on 200 of them. I want to see these magazines succeed. From the way that they are put into the app; the way pulling out a story delivers a message; to the push notifications. We’re championing great reading.

On selling content story-by-story instead of offering the entire experience: One of the main ways people read many brands is cover to cover. They’ll go into the app, they love the magazines that are their favorites, and they read cover to cover and we see that in our data. However, by offering them singles, we’re potentially offering them the chance to sample something that they might not. And in fact, one of the more interesting aspects after the horrible Paris attacks; we collected stories together about how Islamic terrorism might have come to Paris. And there’s a piece from The New Yorker and a piece from Time about why did this happen; what’s going on. And there was a piece from Vogue about the wives and female jihadists. And a number of people said to me: I would have expected that piece from The New Yorker; I would have expected that piece from Time, but I didn’t know that was in Vogue, and it gave me a new appreciation of Vogue.

On what keeps her up at night: People believing that the only way to get great magazine content is a website; that’s not the case anymore. We’re here; we have a great product and it’s improving every single day and I just want more people to know about it.

And now the lightly edited transcript of the Mr. Magazine™ Interview with Maggie Murphy, Editorial Content Director, Texture.

Samir Husni: Recently there was some news about Texture, that now you can view it on a horizontal screen as opposed to only vertical. And you’re also signing digital-only magazines, so as one who was so involved in the print component of a magazine; how do you access the feeling of reading something article by article versus having an actual magazine in your hand?

unnamedMaggie Murphy: That’s a great question. I have really loved reading as many magazines as I get to do, thanks to the Texture app. That was my reintroduction to it because I had worked at Time Inc. when the original idea was invented by John Squires and he had worked with a consortium of publishers to get them to sign on. But I hadn’t really looked at the app until last spring and when I opened it up I thought to myself, oh my gosh, where has this been?

It was getting harder and harder to find magazines, especially in New York, and I never seemed to have one in my hand when I wanted to read one. And carrying around my device and just loading the app, I was suddenly able to read things that I hadn’t in months. There was everything I loved about Real Simple at my fingertips; there was The New Yorker; Vogue; just everything. And I think it made me actually an even more diverse reader, for instance, the app’s connection and our relationship with Rogers Communications, which is one of our owners; I was going to read Maclean’s and Maclean’s take on the U.S. election is fascinating.

So, I think that we’re moving to a more accepting place, that this is one way that we have our phones with us all the time and I can’t count on always being able to find a magazine in paper, but I can truly always have a magazine at my disposal thanks to the app.

Samir Husni: Do you think that the experience changes; do you get the same feeling when you’re flipping through the pages of a magazine, feeling the weight of Vogue in your hand, as opposed to not feeling the weight? Does that make a difference in that experience?

Maggie Murphy: I look at that question very differently than some do. I would often hear readers penalize magazines because they weren’t thick, even though the content was good, if not better, and the reason they weren’t thick anymore may have had to do with, not the status or the quality of the work, but because of the way the advertising industry had changed.

And I feel a digital experience delivers to me quality content, and the second thing about it is that I can share that content. I’m running around over time; I’m trying to simplify my life, and I come across a story in Marie Claire that I really think my niece would love, I can send that to her in one step.

I think you’re going to have people who will always love the feel of paper; they appreciate it, but the reality is that when it comes to the visual experience, the iPad does a wonderful job of giving me a beautiful image of National Geographic. It looks as vibrant on the screen as when I would produce a magazine.

That was always actually really interesting; we would use E-readers, as everybody does, to check proofs. You go through the magazine in your last hours before you pushed the button and you’d flip through it. It’s the last stage most editors go through. And the colors were always so vibrant. And sometimes paper would not always print as we’d hoped. And for me, I feel the transition is here and the up side of it is tremendous. The availability; the grasp and the range that is always with me outweigh any charm of having a bundled-up magazine or newspaper in my pocket.

Samir Husni: Last May I took a group of my students to New York and we attended a conference where one magazine publisher after another said that the tablet was dead; the homepage was dead, and it was now all about mobile, videos and notifications. Do you agree with that statement?

Maggie Murphy: (Laughs) No, I don’t.

Samir Husni: (Laughs too).

Maggie Murphy: I think just like the lyrics in one Bruce Springsteen song says: everything that dies one day grows back. I believe there was incredible bitterness and disappointment in the arrival of the tablet and how it was supposed to save magazines, and unfortunately that wasn’t the case. But I think there was too much too soon, before the reader was ready. And I don’t believe the technology was as nimble as our ambitions.

But now as we move toward something that looks more like a phablet, you know it’s not that far from a mini iPad; I feel that the ultimate reason I don’t agree with that statement is that the magazine-reading experience, that narrative, is told with pictures and words over a period of a few minutes or in the case of The Atavist’s Mastermind, which we debuted recently, over a number of weeks, is so well-suited for this device.

We took content and tried to just add to it and move it onto the tablet and it didn’t work at first, but a lot of things don’t work at first. And then later they work better. And also other things that people have said died came back, vinyl, for example. I don’t think we’ve quite figured out what magazine making transforms into with these new devices. And what these new devices will be. We’re going to have a digital reader of some kind. Now, for some people it’s going to be their phone and with others it may be the new Amazon reader which our app is now available on that product.

I read somewhere that there are 40 million magazine subscribers. I don’t have to get all of them; I’d love to have all of them, if everyone downloaded the app, think of all of the trees that we’d save; it would be fabulous. However, I do think that I can get a good portion of those people. I think we can get people who are magazine readers and who are tired of subscribing to a magazine for $10 or $15 and getting a blow card from them. We bring real value. I want culturally-curated content; I want to read.

And that’s what was so revelatory for me when I rediscovered the app in the spring when John Loughlin, our CEO, reached out to me and said he might be looking for an editor to help curate this. After months and months of working in blogs, I appreciate getting content quick and readily because I want to read stories. I still think magazines, hands-down, deliver that better than any other medium.

The challenge of magazines these days is that we’re delivering them the same way that we did 50 years ago. There’s a guy with a truck and a newsstand (Laughs); it’s not an efficient way. This is a good way. I believe there will always be things that you want on paper, but I don’t think that means that we can’t have this experience digitally.

It is almost impossible to find a newsstand in New York that allows you to browse. At supermarkets and drug chains, they’ve moved those pockets and magazine racks to the back or the side of the store. Sometimes, with the weeklies, it’s hard to figure out if that’s the old cover or the new cover. What’s dying is the 50-plus-year-old newsstand delivery system, not the value of the words, the images, the content, or the editorial packaging that makes a magazine, a magazine. People still love magazines. But it’s like the opening of The Six Million Dollar Man: we can deliver them better and faster than we did before. Most people who try Texture are blown away by what they get. Our stats show that users come in for a magazine and are sampling content they never knew they would enjoy. They double and triple their magazine-reading time. We are addictive and habit- forming. And we are the ultimate de-clutterer. What’s not to love?

And I do think it’s a different type of story. If you talk to people, there is content on a website and there is content in a magazine; it’s very different skills that produce each. They’re all very important; one is not superior to the other.

The question is how do we make money and that’s one of the things about this app. It allows magazines to make money off of traditional structures in a digital way and because the advertising is included it can count towards someone’s rate base, and also by paying through that monthly fee, the magazines get a portion of that every month. So, there is a new revenue stream here. It’s very small today, but I don’t think that it’s going to stay that way.

Samir Husni: What’s the total number of magazines that are available on the app now?

Maggie Murphy: We’re closing in on 200 magazines and recently we added the Reader’s Digest team, along with The Atavist, so we’re covering from every spectrum. And we have all of the partners’ brands, so that’s all of the magazines from Time Inc., from Sports Illustrated to People to EW and of course Time magazine. We have Condé Nast and all of their brands, such as Bon Appétit, Vogue and The New Yorker. We have all of Hearst’s wonderful titles, like Marie Claire, Esquire, Town & Country and we have titles outside our partners. We have hundreds of magazines, literally thousands of articles and I’m really excited by what I get to read. It’s a small team, myself and two other editors, and each day we read as much as we can and really overlap interesting stories.

I was just reading Rolling Stone’s cover story on Bernie versus Hillary. There was the Chatelaine story about whether or not we’re drinking too much. (Laughs) And there was a beautiful piece in Time recently from Patti Davis about her mom, Nancy Reagan, and these are things that we can call out. It’s a great opportunity to curate amazing content.

Samir Husni: Describe the difference between what you did as editor of Parade, where you were assigning stories and creating content, to where you are now, curating content. How do you feel your job has changed?

Maggie Murphy: Today Texture isn’t creating content, but I don’t think that’s off the table. I believe that could be a long-term goal and I especially think as we look at how wonderful things like The Atavist’s Mastermind is doing, that’s a model that we’re intrigued by.

Fundamentally, when I said that I wanted to be a journalist, to me, that meant that I wanted to work in magazines and I am working in magazines. And I think I’m working in magazines at a time and with a platform that shows a different way to go forward. And potentially, in a way that can really become an incredibly engaging business for people who want to read researched, visually enticing, reported narratives.

And we see the quest and the desire to read stories of substance; stories of consequence. And stories that are really helpful. Brands with consumer reports do wonderfully in our app. Service stories do terrific. And we can not only give people Real Simple’s tips for declaring this week, but we can package together their content dating back until 2012 and we can do this for magazine editors themselves, where it’s difficult sometimes to go back and ask, didn’t we do this story a few years back? With the touch of their fingertips, they can search these brands. So, if you’re interested in planning an Italian vacation, through our search you can get stories from Afar and Condé Nast Traveler and many others.

I love magazine making and I would so like to continue in some creative outlet, but I had always envisioned that my next career would be a librarian. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: (Laughs too).

Maggie Murphy: But I’m sitting here every day and all of these wonderful stories are coming in and I can ask people, have you read this story or that terrific story? It’s just very exciting every single day. It’s like Christmas. I open it up and say: oh my gosh, Esquire is dropping, this is so exciting. We get so thrilled when GQ is coming in.

And one of the other things that we’re able to do with our partners is early access, so for instance, on the Thursday before Vanity Fair dropped its amazing Jennifer Garner story, we saw an early version of that story and Condé Nast was so wonderful to give it to us early on Friday. So, we had that story simultaneously with the same time their website had it. Our subscribers got to read it with the pictures and in the way that the content makers had developed it. And of course, it was mutually engaging and I got to say that I had just read the story and it was amazing.

Samir Husni: Why do I have to pay money to access Texture when I can get the same content if I go to Vanity Fair?

Maggie Murphy: I think that’s one of the things that we’d like to encourage with magazine makers. Most content that appears in magazines is not on the website. They’re different formats. Most magazines aren’t putting the content that they are developing for their print brands online, some of it appears, some of it doesn’t, but if it’s behind a paywall, it’s there. I think that’s one of the issues that is still being navigated. I could see why a brand would want to put a hot story out there, but we’re offering a different way to give people access to that in a way that allows us to continue to do those stories.

If the entire business had it to do over again, would we follow the same path of just repurposing our content and putting it online? I think what we realized is that it doesn’t work as well as content that was made for digital. It’s a different format. A website and what you’re looking for online is very different than the print experience and what you’re aiming to learn when you sit down and read a magazine.

What we believe is for someone who is looking for that magazine experience, and people love magazines; what we’re saying is this is a way to get all of them at your fingertips, just like there is in a Netflix model or a satellite radio model and there’s a fee for that so that we can make sure that we can continue to pay for it and continue a revenue model.

That’s one of the things that we’d like to see. We’d like to see more and more access simultaneously and eventually the partners will have to kind of come to terms on how they want to distribute their content. But we think that this is a viable alternative to subscription and giving people something behind a paywall.

Recently, I went downstairs and got a free cup of coffee at the hotel. It hit the spot. It did the job. But it’s not like my venti Pike from Starbucks. Which I not only enjoy, I savor. It makes me feel satisfied and happy. I pay $4 a day for that experience. That’s valuable to me because it brings me joy. There is a lot of good content out there for free. But I want great content. That brings me joy. For our premium subscription, that’s roughly 50 cents a day, I am able to read a New Yorker story, a Popular Mechanics feature; introduce my daughter to Cricket or National Geographic, and still check out “Stars Like Us” and that’s a great value. Yes, I can do that on the web, but it’s not a singular storefront. Plus, once I am in the store, there’s something new to read or investigate, whether it’s a recipe or a travel story. And we’re doing more early access to content. Whether that was Jennifer Garner’s Vanity Fair cover story or a first look at EW’s David Bowie issue.

The truth is most magazines do not end up putting all of the brand’s content on the website. What works on a website, for the most part, is a different type of story, just as newspaper stories were different than magazine stories. I do believe there are readers who don’t feel strongly about the difference and will never pay for content again. Post-recession, it’s just not what they do. You can see that in the decline of the gossips. But I do believe there is a reader who wants a reading experience beyond listicles and bulleted pieces. There are many blogs I enjoy, but I don’t want every experience through a personal lens. I want to read that richly reported piece. I want the fact-checked recipe from Bon Appétit.

Digitally, brands like The Atavist are exploring magazine long-form—and that’s what makes our partnership with them so exciting. But we showcase stories on Texture that might not get showcased elsewhere. There was a wonderful essay from Self last month that we featured in our New & Noteworthy that might not have been seen outside the confines of the print product if you didn’t have a subscription to the magazine. I would say that Texture is a new way for brands that are beloved and have been part of the fabric of American life to thrive digitally, separate from their web and mobile-based experiences. I don’t know her, but Kate Lewis of Hearst said something that I think is spot on: “Print tells me what’s next. Digital tells me what’s now.” I think many, many readers still want to learn what’s next, and magazines (on paper or in Texture) still do that better than any other medium. Put another way: Think about filmed content. You can have it delivered on network, on cable, in pay-per-view, or via YouTube. And many other ways. The publishing industry has finally caught up to the television industry in providing many varied content experiences: on paper, on web, through mobile, social, vlog, blog, and in app via Texture. Among others being invented as we speak.

Samir Husni: If you and I are having this same conversation a year from now; what do you hope that you can tell me you have accomplished during that year?

Maggie Murphy: That’s a really good question. The biggest problem we face right now is just that people don’t know that we exist. We’re doing our very best to get the message out there. We’re working with our owners, who have been incredibly supportive by really investing in the brand, and really updating it. We’re working on a mobile adaptive so that we’re really able to deliver magazine content in a mobile-friendly manner for the phablet that is to come. And I think it’s just really giving magazine lovers choice, of saying here’s another way. There is paper; there is the website, and there is a magazine app that is a Spotify for magazines; a Netflix for magazines, for those people out there who want this experience, but want it in a more convenient, on-the-go way.

Samir Husni: What motivates you to get out of bed in the morning and take on the day?

Maggie Murphy: I still get to discover great stories; that’s what I like about it. I was talking to friends one day and they asked me why I got into this business. I simply told them: I love magazines. I thought it would be cool to work on magazines.

And today I’m not working on simply one; I’m working on 200 of them. I want to see these magazines succeed. From the way that they are put into the app; the way pulling out a story delivers a message; to the push notifications. We’re championing great reading. And our readers are responding. The Texture reader is cultured, curious; they have high incomes and they really love this kind of content. I feel like I’m championing great content, which is what I always wanted to do. So, when you’re doing something that really speaks to your core, you feel it’s important. And I do. I feel that this is important.

I have had a tremendous career working at some of the best brands that gave ever been around. And I have many, many friends who are in their 20s and 30s who really love magazine making. And for me, I think this is a way forward. The technology will get better; the organization and what-belongs-where will get better and the support of the companies has just been fantastic. I think that there’s nowhere to go but up. I don’t believe that this is the death of something; I think it’s the beginning of something. And I think that’s where we need to not to be negative. As magazine editors, there are new ways to deliver our content. And that’s what we are: a new way. And it’s really a fun experience. Just this morning, I read Rolling Stone and Esquire; both before breakfast. (Laughs)

Samir Husni: On Spotify I listen to a complete song; Netflix, I watch a complete movie; are we changing the experience when you actually sell a story, rather than a complete magazine experience; instead, you are selling segments of that experience. Are you in the sampling business or the entire content business?

Maggie Murphy: I would flip that question first; one of the main ways people read many brands is cover to cover. They’ll go into the app, they love the magazines that are their favorites, and they read cover to cover and we see that in our data. However, by offering them singles, we’re potentially offering them the chance to sample something that they might not. And in fact, one of the more interesting aspects after the horrible Paris attacks; we collected stories together about how Islamic terrorism might have come to Paris. And there’s a piece from The New Yorker and a piece from Time about why did this happen; what’s going on. And there was a piece from Vogue about the wives and female jihadists. And a number of people said to me: I would have expected that piece from The New Yorker; I would have expected that piece from Time, but I didn’t know that was in Vogue, and it gave me a new appreciation of Vogue.

And that I believe is what we’re doing. There are people who love albums and love the entire experience. And there are people who love the entire magazine and want it cover to cover, but I listen to music sometimes one at a time. Give me a great Pop song, and then I might take two or three. I like to sample and then commit. I think you’re going to have both types of readers; you’re going to have every type of reader. There’s enough content and I would say that this is the multiplex and we’re offering trailers. Here’s a taste of this, you might like that. Being able to deliver that overtime builds discovery. We believe that we can build discovery with this model, while we’re still serving the person who wants to read their magazine cover to cover and have that unique experience.

Samir Husni: My typical last question; what keeps you up at night?

Maggie Murphy: People believing that the only way to get great magazine content is a website; that’s not the case anymore. We’re here; we have a great product and it’s improving every single day and I just want more people to know about it.

Samir Husni: Thank you.

Our Editorial Director Shares What She’s Learned Pitching Texture on HSN

MAggieMurphy

Greetings from Tampa:  I am spending a lot of time in Florida this month as part of Texture’s latest marketing effort, appearing on the HSN shopping channel for our must-have magazine app. Even the most hardened news veterans would be humbled by what these hosts do. HSN’s Carrie Smith (above) and the team keep a billion and one teeny details in their heads, while also wheezing around ginormous sets making seamless pitches for hundreds of products. My years of TV segment appearances—on everything from Morning Joe to Wendy Williams—didn’t prepare me for the speed and complexity of their work.  While I won’t get an Oscar nomination for my performances the way Jennifer Lawrence did for channeling a certain home shopping queen, it is a ‘joy’ to try my hand at this awe-inspiring operation. Offering our app, which is unlimited access to over 200 of the world’s best magazines, on HSN is a smart way for us to reach travel fans, foodies eager to find the very best recipes, beauty and fashion fanatics, and gossip lovers who want their weeklies to stay in the know. Our app is everything you love about magazines, at your fingertips, minus the coffee-table clutter. Personally, I am hoping to score a discount on some Joy Mangano luggage. Being around all these amazing deals (loving Serena Williams’ dresses and sweater wraps!)  is really addictive.

Keith Kelly of New York Post Reports on Texture

keithkelly

Texture, dubbed the Netflix of the magazine world, is set to get a big boost when Apple clears it for in-app purchases through its iTunes store.

Texture CEO John Loughlin said he expects to clear that hurdle by July 10, potentially unlocking a whole new base of customers. The app is already available on Android devices.

In addition, Sprint will start pre-installing the app on Android phones that it sells starting later this summer, making it available to more than 1 million customers each month.

He would not disclose how many paying subscribers Texture has now, but said it is in the “hundreds of thousands.”

The company, formerly called Next Issue Media, allows subscribers to pay $9.99 a month to gain access to up to 200 magazines on their mobile phones, iPads and other digital devices.

To add the more costly weekly magazines to the mix, subscribers pay $14.99 a month. The top tier includes more expensive trades like Billboard, The Hollywood Reporter and Variety and will soon add Women’s Wear Daily.

Instead of cannibalizing existing magazine subscribers with lower-priced digital subscriptions, Loughlin said the service is expanding the market. Only about 20 percent of Texture’s subscribers dropped print in favor of the digital service, he said.

Meanwhile, Texture paid $15 million in subscription revenue to publishers last year.

Loughlin declined to be specific but said revenue is in excess of $20 million and subscribers rose by 50 percent last year. He expects a similar subscriber jump this year.

The company, backed by several major media companies, received $40 million last year from its venture partners including Time Inc., Condé Nast, Meredith, Canadian publisher Rogers Media and News Corp., which also owns The Post. That’s on top of $50 million it raised in December 2014 from private equity giant KKR.

AdAge Introduces Our Partnership with Home Shopping Network

AdAge

John Loughlin, chief executive officer of magazine subscription service Texture, is setting his ambitions high, even in a highly competitive media market in which consumers are loath to open their wallets.

“The objective here is this should be a mass consumer service,” said Mr. Loughlin.

But Texture still has a long way to go, and is focused right now on increasing product awareness and making sure more potential consumers know about the so-called “Netflix for magazines,” which charges $9.99 per month for the basic plan or $14.99 for the premium plan, which also includes unlimited access to weekly magazines.

As part of this marketing effort, Texture began this week a tie-in with Home Shopping Network (HSN) that will run through the end of the year. The agreement is multi-faceted, and is meant to provide returns to both companies.

Texture’s editorial content director Maggie Murphy, a veteran of People and LIFE magazines, has already begun appearing on HSN, highlighting “must-read and exclusive articles, stories, tips and recommendations” from magazines that appear in the Texture app. There will also be paid segments on HSN meant to promote Texture, as well as brand integrations.

For HSN’s benefit, the network’s catalogs will be featured in a new “Shopping” tab on Texture, and items will be featured in Texture collections, as warranted.

Sean Bunner, an HSN executive focused on new business development, said the Texture partnership is part of the network’s Brand Marketing Alliances program, through which they’ve worked with companies including Toyota, Ford and Norwegian Cruise Lines. He said Texture has an “innovative editorial perspective” and “a service that sells better with demonstration and explanation, which HSN’s platform for storytelling is uniquely suited for.”

Mr. Loughlin pitched the HSN partnership as a test of whether content and commerce can truly work hand-in-hand. HSN and Texture, he said, do well with similar audiences: mostly women in their mid-30s to mid-50s who live in high-income households.

As a private company, Texture has never revealed how many people subscribe to the service, but Mr. Loughlin confirmed the number is “substantially in excess of” 200,000. Between the end of 2014 and the end of 2015, Texture saw 52% growth in net paid memberships. Mr. Loughlin said the company is targeting between 40% and 50% net growth for 2016.

Texture is not out there alone, though. The service was launched in 2010 as a partnership between media giants. In addition to providing funding, these companies — Condé Nast, Hearst, Meredith, News Corp., Rogers Communications and Time Inc. — provide Texture with in-kind advertising. The service, formerly known as Next Issue Media, was re-branded and re-introduced in the fall of 2015.

Last year, Texture spent almost $50 million on advertising, when factoring in cash purchases and in-kind advertising provided by its publisher-owners. Mr. Loughlin predicted that Texture would have a similar ad spend in 2016.

Texture is well-capitalized, having raised $130 million since the end of 2014 — $80 million from the media companies that launched it, and $50 million from investment firm KKR.

But Mr. Loughlin hinted that Texture could raise even more money at the end of 2017, “assuming that projections hold.”

Asked whether profitability is a goal, Mr. Loughlin said, “The objective is not to force this business to break even. Our objective is to force this business to grow … ” Subscibers are expensive to attract, he said, but normally remain customers for a long time.

The fate of Texture is in some ways linked to that of the magazine industry, which is changing rapidly, as companies that once relied solely on subscriptions and print advertising are now looking to social media platforms and live events, among other opportunities, for new revenue streams. Mr. Loughlin acknowledged that magazines are an industry in transition, but said the business has “proved incredibly resilient and fairly healthy.”

While advertising fluctuates, he said, the consumer side of magazines has been more stable. “Consumers haven’t abandoned magazines,” he said. “I think advertisers just have more choices, which creates pressure on some of these publishers.”

The Best & Worst Cities to Be a Dog

The Best & Worst Cities to Be a Dog, New York Magazine, July 25 - August 7, 2016
The Best & Worst Cities to Be a Dog, New York Magazine, July 25 – August 7, 2016

With urban dog owners spending $23 billion on pet foods that cater to vegan and other specialty diets, and $15 billion on pet medical care, cities and companies are creating five-star experiences for our four-legged friends. VIPs (Very Important Pups): In New York City, there is a members-only dog run where you can spot celebrities curbing their very own Spot. In Huntington Beach, CA, dogs can run on the beach and take part in a surfing competition. Move Over, Fro-Yo: Fi-Yo is gluten-, grain-, egg-, soy-free frozen yogurt doggy dessert sold in San Diego and Chicago. The Pits: Denver banned pit bulls from the city because they’re “dangerous.” In Seattle, dog runs are hard to come by. Pawternity Leave: Several British companies are allowing employees who are new dog owners up to a week off. Canine Kush: In Los Angeles, VETCBD saves pet owners thousands on pricey pharmaceuticals, offering specific cannabinoids to relieve canine arthritis, seizures, and nausea. All Dogs Go to This Place Before Heaven: A Tokyo pet can live out his final days at Aeonpet, a $1,500-a-month luxury doggy retirement home, before heading off-leash through the pearly gates. Welcome to the dog days!

Turn Your Clutter Into Cash

Buy It, Sell It, Real Simple, August 2016
Buy It, Sell It, Real Simple, August 2016

If you’ve got furniture to sell—or you’re on the hunt for a one-of-a-kind piece—Real Simple updates you on the smartest ways to haggle on Craigslist, score on Etsy, and discover some new furniture-swap sites. For Your Posh Pieces: From Victorian settees to Lucite vanities, Chairish is the go-to buying and selling site for designers. Looking for high style and good value? Come here. Create a Virtual Garage Sale: Find vintage, secondhand, and handmade items in your neighborhood through KKRB (pronounced “curb”), which lets you set up a corner to sell your merch, or discover what’s for sale just down the road. For City Dwellers: The secondhand furniture site, AptDeco, now includes a low-cost shipping service in New York City and Washington D.C. (coming soon to Philadelphia and Baltimore). It also partners with stores like BoConcept New York to sell off-season items at hefty discounts.